• tags: infographics eating nutrition

  • tags: new york nytimes com haikus

  • tags: evernote annotation ipad apps presentations android visuals design creating

  • tags: visuals creating online design blog

  • tags: google google+analytics teaching web tools elearning

  • tags: webinar web_conferencing elearning conferencing web2.0 teaching web tools

  • tags: web tools web2.0 teaching

  • tags: collaboration writing editing web2.0

  • tags: Marquez interview literature writing

    • What ticks you off about the tape recording everything is that it is not loyal to the person who is being interviewed, because it even records and remembers when you make an ass of yourself. That’s why when there is a tape recorder, I am conscious that I’m being interviewed; when there isn’t a tape recorder, I talk in an unconscious and completely natural way.
    • Nothing. I don’t think there is any difference. The sources are the same, the material is the same, the resources and the language are the same. The Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe is a great novel and Hiroshima is a great work of journalism.
    • In journalism just one fact that is false prejudices the entire work. In contrast, in fiction one single fact that is true gives legitimacy to the entire work.
    • A novelist can do anything he wants so long as he makes people believe in it.
    • certain general responsibility that is literary and political. There’s even pride involved, in not wanting to fall short of what I did before.
    • experiencing it as if I were reading it
    • It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there’s not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality.
    • writing about the village and my childhood was really an escape from having to face and write about the political reality of the country.
    • She told things that sounded supernatural and fantastic, but she told them with complete naturalness.
    • Ultimately, literature is nothing but carpentry.
    • Both are very hard work. Writing something is almost as hard as making a table. With both you are working with reality, a material just as hard as wood. Both are full of tricks and techniques. Basically very little magic and a lot of hard work are involved. And as Proust, I think, said, it takes ten percent inspiration and ninety percent perspiration. I never have done any carpentry but it’s the job I admire most, especially because you can never find anyone to do it for you.
    • n every novel, the character is a collage: a collage of different characters that you’ve known, or heard about or read about.
    • when I had a clear idea of what the character was going to be like, I made an effort to forget everything I had read and heard, so that I could invent, without using any situation that had occurred in real life.
    • The more power you have, the harder it is to know who is lying to you and who is not. When you reach absolute power, there is no contact with reality, and that’s the worst kind of solitude there can be. A very powerful person, a dictator, is surrounded by interests and people whose final aim is to isolate him from reality; everything is in concert to isolate him.

       

    • The writer’s very attempt to portray reality often leads him to a distorted view of it. In trying to transpose reality he can end up losing contact with it, in an ivory tower, as they say.
    • solitude of fame,
    • in the genesis of all my books there’s always an image.
    • if I didn’t learn technique, I would be in trouble later on when the inspiration had gone and the technique was needed to compensate
    • To be a good writer you have to be absolutely lucid at every moment of writing, and in good health.
    • I think that writing is very difficult, but so is any job carefully executed. What is a privilege, however, is to do a job to your own satisfaction.
    • But what I most admire is something well done. I’m always very happy when I’m traveling to know that the pilots are better pilots than I am a writer.
    • there is no worse job than doing something you don’t like.
    • One of the most difficult things is the first paragraph. I have spent many months on a first paragraph, and once I get it, the rest just comes out very easily. In the first paragraph you solve most of the problems with your book. The theme is defined, the style, the tone. At least in my case, the first paragraph is a kind of sample of what the rest of the book is going to be. That’s why writing a book of short stories is much more difficult than writing a novel. Every time you write a short story, you have to begin all over again.
    • Inspiration is when you find the right theme, one which you really like; that makes the work much easier. Intuition, which is also fundamental to writing fiction, is a special quality which helps you to decipher what is real without needing scientific knowledge, or any other special kind of learning.
    • It’s a way of having experience without having to struggle through it.
    • They have claimed for themselves the task of being intermediaries between the author and the reader. I’ve always tried to be a very clear and precise writer, trying to reach the reader directly without having to go through the critic.
    • A good translation is always a re-creation in another language.
    • They are intuitive rather than intellectual.
    • I prefer reading a mediocre translation of a book than trying to get through it in the original language. I never feel comfortable reading in another language, because the only language I really feel inside is Spanish.
    • anywhere else in the world, I feel like a foreigner, a feeling that robs me of a sense of security. It’s a personal feeling, but I always have it when I travel.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Advertisements